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Buddha’s Wisdom, Chapters 8-14

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Buddha’s Wisdom, Chapters 8-14.

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Chapters 08-14

 

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001 Title Page

001 Title Page

089 Chapter 08 Words

089 Chapter 08 Words


Not Listening to Divisive Speech

A jackal tries to divide a lion and a tiger by sowing dissension so he can eat their flesh. They remain friends and the jackal flees.

090 Not Listening to Divisive Speech

090 Not Listening to Divisive Speech


Reconciliation and Responsibility

A father and a younger brother argue along the road, and the Bodhisatta reproves them with these words.

091 Reconciliation and Responsibility

091 Reconciliation and Responsibility


Friendship is more Valuable than Wealth

A rich man gives half his wealth to one fallen on hard times; but when he is in need himself the other offers him only rice gruel. He accepts it so as not to rebuff the obligations of friendship. Later the King hears about it and restores his wealth.

092 Friendship is more Valuable than Wealth

092 Friendship is more Valuable than Wealth


Who to Keep Company With

The monk Channa is always abusing Sāriputta and Mahāmoggallāna. When the Buddha finds out he admonishes him thus.

093 Who to Keep Company With

093 Who to Keep Company With


True Friends

The Bodhisatta is an ascetic who is invited by the King to stay in his park. After some time the King plots to kill him, and he decides to leave. When questioned why he is going this is his reply.

094 True Friends 1

094 True Friends 1

095 True Friends 2

095 True Friends 2


Deeds not Words Measure a Friend

A King of the geese is invited by the King of men to stay with him, but he declines with these words.

096 Deeds not Words Measure a Friend 1

096 Deeds not Words Measure a Friend 1

097 Deeds not Words Measure a Friend 2

097 Deeds not Words Measure a Friend 2


The Consequences of Listening to Slander

A jackal using slander sets two friends fighting, a bull and a lion, and eventually they kill each other. The jackal then eats their flesh. The King of men, the Bodhisatta, reflects on it in these verses addressed to his charioteer.

098 The Consequences of Listening to Slander 1

098 The Consequences of Listening to Slander 1

099 The Consequences of Listening to Slander 2

099 The Consequences of Listening to Slander 2

100 Chapter 09 Gratefulness

100 Chapter 09 Gratefulness


Faithfulness in Friendship

Sakka, to try the contentment of a parrot, dries up the tree he lives on, all the other birds desert it but the parrot stays on. Sakka, taking the form of a goose, engaged in this dialogue.

101 Faithfulness in Friendship 1

101 Faithfulness in Friendship 1

102 Faithfulness in Friendship 2

102 Faithfulness in Friendship 2


Faithfulness in Friendship

Sakka, to try the contentment of a parrot, dries up the tree he lives on, all the other birds desert it but the parrot stays on. Sakka, taking the form of a goose, engaged in this dialogue.

103 Faithfulness in Friendship 1

103 Faithfulness in Friendship 1

104 Faithfulness in Friendship 2

104 Faithfulness in Friendship 2


Understanding Consequences

To rid his father of a mosquito that has landed on his head a son takes an axe and slaughters both the mosquito and his father with one blow.

105 Understanding Consequences

105 Understanding Consequences


Qualities Esteemed in the World

Sakka asks the Bodhisatta for a definition of the Good Person.

106 Qualities Esteemed in the World

106 Qualities Esteemed in the World


The Qualities of a Good Person

The Buddha explains that Sakka, the Lord of the Gods, received his position after undertaking seven vows, which are outlined here.

107 The Qualities of a Good Person

107 The Qualities of a Good Person


Greed brings Dire Consequences

A forester, lost in the forest, is saved by the Bodhisatta, a King of the Elephants. Later he returns and asks for the Bodhisatta’s tusks, which he readily gives. But not satisfied he returns again and demands the roots of the tusks. While leaving the earth opens up and swallows him.

108 Greed brings Dire Consequences

108 Greed brings Dire Consequences


The Power of Truth

The Bodhisatta saves a wicked prince who, when later he has ascended the throne, seeing him in the capital, has him flogged and taken out for execution. The Bodhisatta doesn’t get upset but repeats this verse. The people set him free, and kill the wicked King instead.

109 The Power of Truth

109 The Power of Truth


Unexpected Consequences

The Bodhisatta teaches a brahmin youth a spell for restoring life to the dead. Thoughtlessly the youth uses it on a tiger who then kills and eats him.

110 Unexpected Consequences

110 Unexpected Consequences


The Reward for Good Actions

A royalist treats with kindness a great horseman who has been defeated in battle, not knowing it is the King himself. The great horseman tells him if he comes to the city he will receive his reward. One day the man comes and the King gives him half his kingdom.

111 The Reward for Good Actions

111 The Reward for Good Actions


Deeds are Seeds

Three boys receive an education, two rich, one poor, whose fees are paid for by the first of the boys. Later the poor boy finds out how to become King, but bestows it on his benefactor, and the second boy becomes the Commander-in-Chief. Later the latter abuses and disowns him, but the King, the Bodhisatta, rebukes the Commander-in-Chief, and utters these verses.

112 Deeds are Seeds

112 Deeds are Seeds


The Reciprocity of Deeds

A merchant sends a caravan to Sāvatthī and is helped by Anāthapiṇḍika; later the latter sends a caravan back to the merchant, but they are rebuked; when they come again to Sāvatthī and are robbed they are left with no one to help them.

113 The Reciprocity of Deeds

113 The Reciprocity of Deeds


Remembering Service Rendered

An elephant renders great service to the King, but once grown old is neglected and scorned. The Bodhisatta admonishes the King with these verses.

114 Remembering Service Rendered

114 Remembering Service Rendered


Who to Follow

The Buddha explains to the monks the three types of person in the world and what their attitude should be towards them, and summarises the teaching with a verse.

115 Who to Follow

115 Who to Follow


Abandoning an Ingrate

A bird helps a lion by removing a bone stuck in its throat, but when asked to requite he haughtily refuses.

116 Abandoning an Ingrate

116 Abandoning an Ingrate

117 Chapter 10 Association 1

117 Chapter 10 Association 1


Discrimination in whom to Follow

A Father and Son are living as ascetics in the Himālayas when a woman tries to lure the Son away to the city. When he finds out the Father admonishes him with these verses, and he maintains his state.

118 Discrimination in whom to Follow 1

118 Discrimination in whom to Follow 1

119 Discrimination in whom to Follow 2

119 Discrimination in whom to Follow 2

120 Discrimination in whom to Follow 3

120 Discrimination in whom to Follow 3


Choosing Friends Carefully

An arrogant ascetic from the Indasamāna clan kept an elephant as a pet. His teacher, the Bodhisatta, warned him of the danger, but he would not listen. One day the elephant trampled him to death.

121 Choosing Friends Carefully

121 Choosing Friends Carefully


Intimacy with the Wicked and the Righteous

A brahmin ascetic feeds his sacred fire with ghee and milk-rice and it flares up and burns down his hut. Later he saw a black deer who was intimate with his traditional enemies the lion, the tiger and the panther and he spoke these verses.

122 Intimacy with the Wicked and the Righteous

122 Intimacy with the Wicked and the Righteous


Consorting with the Wicked

An iguana makes friends with a chameleon, who he is wont to embrace. The chameleon, fearing for his life, calls in a hunter and destroys the iguana family.

123 Consorting with the Wicked

123 Consorting with the Wicked


Association

The Buddha explains the three kinds of happiness people should wish for, and warns against bad reputation.

124 Association

124 Association


Appearance is not All

King Pasenadi interrupts his interview with the Buddha to pay respect to various kinds of ascetics who are passing nearby. The Buddha cautions that outward appearance is not trustworthy, and the King admits that these are his spies.

125 Appearance is not All

125 Appearance is not All


Deceitful Appearances

A crow pretends to be a holy ascetic who lives on air alone, but secretly eats the eggs and young of other birds when left alone. Eventually he is caught and put to death.

126 Deceitful Appearances

126 Deceitful Appearances

127 Chapter 11 Association 2

127 Chapter 11 Association 2


According to Upbringing

Two parrots who are brothers are brought up differently, one in a robber-village, and one in a hermitage of the wise. When a King loses his way the first wants to kill and rob him, while the second offers him a helping hand.

128 According to Upbringing 1

128 According to Upbringing 1

129 According to Upbringing 2

129 According to Upbringing 2


Seeing Noble Ones

When the Buddha lies ill Sakka, the King of the Gods, comes to minister to him. The monks wonder why, and the Buddha explains how he previously answered Sakka’s questions whereby he became a stream-enterer.

130 Seeing Noble Ones

130 Seeing Noble Ones


The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous

Five gods approach the Buddha and speak one verse each on the benefits of associating with the wise, to which the Buddha adds the final verse below.

131 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 1

131 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 1

132 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 2

132 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 2

133 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 3

133 The Benefits of Associating with the Virtuous 3


Wander with the Wise or Wander Alone

A King executes a neighbouring King. The latter’s son secretely becomes the King’s trusted confidant, and one day, still intent on revenge, has him alone. But rather than kill him he forgives him, and the two become close friends.

134 Wander with the Wise or Wander Alone

134 Wander with the Wise or Wander Alone


No Friendship with Fools

A faithless pupil of Ven. Mahākassapa tricks a supporter into giving him food and drinks which he says are needed by the elder. Being rebuked he burns down the Elder’s hut and runs away. The whole story is reported to the Buddha.

135 No Friendship with Fools

135 No Friendship with Fools

136 Chapter 12 Trust

136 Chapter 12 Trust


Faith at First Sight

A couple who were the Bodhisatta’s parents in many previous lives greet him as a son in this life, to the confusion of the monks. The Buddha explains their past relationship.

137 Faith at First Sight

137 Faith at First Sight


The Danger of Being too Trusting

A lion so scares the cows pasturing nearby that they don’t give milk. The herdsman covers with poison a hare-deer the lion is fond of, the lion licks her fondly and dies.

138 The Danger of Being too Trusting

138 The Danger of Being too Trusting


Do not Trust the Untrustworthy

A hawk preys on chickens until only the Bodhisatta is left. He tries to lure him out with kind words, but the Bodhisatta resists, not placing his trust in a natural enemy.

139 Do not Trust the Untrustworthy 1

139 Do not Trust the Untrustworthy 1

140 Do not Trust the Untrustworthy 2

140 Do not Trust the Untrustworthy 2


The Trustworthy One

A childless King adopts three birds as his children, which his courtiers scorn. To prove their worth he asks them for advice in ruling the Kingdom, and this is part of what his ‘daughter’ says.

141 The Trustworthy One

141 The Trustworthy One


Keeping a Secret

The Bodhisatta counsels the King not to reveal his secrets to anyone, but others hostile to him say that revealing to a wife, a friend, a brother, a son, or a mother is acceptable. Later the Bodhisatta reveals the secrets that they have told to such, showing their unreliablity. Then he repeats his wise advice.

142 Keeping a Secret 1

142 Keeping a Secret 1

143 Keeping a Secret 2

143 Keeping a Secret 2

144 Chapter 13 Begging

144 Chapter 13 Begging


The Result of Too Much Begging

A dragon falls in love with a hermit and embraces him to his distress. To frighten him away the hermit begs for the dragon’s jewel three times.

145 The Result of Too Much Begging

145 The Result of Too Much Begging


Begging brings Tears

A hermit is invited by a King to stay in his park. For twelve years he desires a pair of shoes and a leaf umbrella but is too ashamed to ask. Eventually he asks, receives, and goes on his way.

146 Begging brings Tears

146 Begging brings Tears


Silent Begging

The King, pleased with a sage, the Bodhisatta, offers him anything from his Kingdom down, but the sage remains silent. The following dialogue ensues.

147 Silent Begging 1

147 Silent Begging 1

148 Silent Begging 2

148 Silent Begging 2


Asking the Right Person at the Right Time

A student desiring to repay his teacher disregards others and waits until the King comes and asks him what he needs, as only the King has the power to solve his problem.

149 Asking the Right Person at the Right Time 1

149 Asking the Right Person at the Right Time 1

150 Asking the Right Person at the Right Time 2

150 Asking the Right Person at the Right Time 2

151 Chapter 14 Blame

151 Chapter 14 Blame


The Eight Worldly Things

The Buddha explains the eight worldly conditions to the monks and summarises them with a verse.

152 The Eight Worldly Things

152 The Eight Worldly Things


Blameworthy

The lay-disciple Atula goes to see Revata, who speaks not, Sāriputta, who speaks at length, and Ānanda who speaks moderately; but he is upset with them all. Finally he goes to the Buddha who explains it thus.

153 Blameworthy

153 Blameworthy


Unperturbed

The Elder Lakuṇṭaka Bhaddiya was a dwarf who attained arahantship. Novices and others used to tease him, but he remained unmoved. The Buddha explained why.

154 Unperturbed

154 Unperturbed


Unshaken by Pleasure and Pain

The monk Yasoja and 500 other monks who are visiting the Buddha are very noisy so he sends them away. They put forth extra effort during the Rains retreat and become Arahats, after which the Buddha sends for them again.

155 Unshaken by Pleasure and Pain

155 Unshaken by Pleasure and Pain


The Wise do not Tremble

The Buddha explains there are five things that cannot be obtained: for those having the nature of ageing, sickness, dying, wasting and destruction that there should be none of these things is impossible. The Noble disciple knows this and does not grieve.

156 The Wise do not Tremble

156 The Wise do not Tremble


Transient Wealth

The Bodhisatta is a King whose Capital is overrun by another King. He refuses to fight as it would involve maiming and killing. The conquering King wonders why he does not struggle, and the Bodhisatta speaks the following verses, after which the other departs.

157 Transient Wealth

157 Transient Wealth


Understanding Nature one Grieves Not

The Bodhisatta, along with his brother and sister, is exiled in the Himālayas. While there he learns that his father the King has died, yet understanding the way of nature he does not grieve.

158 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 1

158 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 1

159 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 2

159 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 2

160 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 3

160 Understanding Nature one Grieves Not 3

Chapters 08-14

 

Text by Ānanadajoti, Photos by Andreas Dīpaloka

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